CAMI - Coalition Advancing Multipurpose Innovations

 

About CAMI

Mission & History

Mission

To advance the development and introduction of strategies that simultaneously address multiple reproductive health needs, namely unintended pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, and other reproductive tract infections.

History

Founded in 2001, CAMI was initially a California-based coalition that worked to promote dialogue and collaboration between developers, researchers and health care providers working in the area of HIV prevention, family planning, reproductive justice, and microbicides. CAMI’s current focus is to promote similar dialogue on a global level. As Secretariat to the Initiative for Multipurpose Prevention Technologies (IMPT),  CAMI focuses our efforts on addressing the intrinsic link between unintended pregnancy and risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

Despite the obvious biological, behavioral, and physiological linkages between the risk for unintended pregnancy and STIs, researchers working to prevent pregnancy, HIV, and other STIs have traditionally worked independently in "silos", tackling these interconnected challenges separately. The Initiative for Multipurpose Prevention Technologies (IMPT) has been formed to help open up these silos by providing a steady stream of information and convening researchers, product developers, advocates, and funders to prioritize development of multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) that can — simultaneously — address these reproductive health risks. 

The Need

Women and their families still suffer avoidable, dire consequences associated with unintended pregnancies and exposure to sexually transmitted infections (including HIV).

  • Each day, approximately 800 women die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth, while in many Sub-Saharan African countries, over 60% of adults living with HIV are women.  Some cities in the US, including the District of Columbia, have HIV incidence rates as high as in Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Young women are some of the hardest hit by unintended pregnancies and exposure to disease around the global.  Among young people ages 15-24, three young women are infected for each young man.
  • Many countries at the core of the HIV/AIDS epidemic also have extremely high rates of unintended pregnancy and other STIs.

A woman at risk for unintended pregnancy due to unprotected intercourse is also at risk for contracting a sexually transmitted infection.  Because of the intrinsic link between unintended pregnancy and STIs, combining protection against these conditions will have life-saving results for women and their families.

There is an urgent need to improve existing reproductive health prevention strategies and to develop new products that will simultaneously prevent unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.

The Challenge

Despite the obvious biological, behavioral, and physiological linkages between the risk for unintended pregnancy and infections, researchers working to prevent pregnancy, HIV, and other STIs often operate in silos within their respective fields.

A primary objective of CAMI is to bridge those silos and facilitate interdisciplinary research to advance a holistic approach towards reproductive health.

CAMI provides a platform for product developers, researchers, advocates and educators working in the reproductive health field to coordinate their efforts.  This intersection is purring new ways of thinking and innovations that could speed up delivery of prevention supplies and programs to the people who need them most.

"We do a better job of planning to buy tickets to see Lady Gaga than we do about being careful in planning for when we're going to have children, how many children and when in our lives we're going to have them."

~ Claire Brindis
Director, Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, UCSF